angle etymology

English word angle comes from Old French (842-ca. 1400) ange, Latin angelus (Angel.)

You can also see our other etymologies for the English word angle. Currently you are viewing the etymology of angle with the meaning: (Noun Verb) A fishhook; tackle for catching fish, consisting of a line, hook, and bait, with or without a rod. (informal) (with for) To attempt to subtly persuade someone to offer a desired thing.. [...]A fishhook; tackle for catching fish, consisting of a line, hook, and bait, with or without a rod. (informal) (with for) To attempt to subtly persuade someone to offer a desired thing.. [...]

Detailed word origin of angle

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
ange Old French (842-ca. 1400) (fro)
angelus Latin (lat) Angel.
*angiluz Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) Angel.
ængel Old English (ca. 450-1100) (ang)
engel Old English (ca. 450-1100) (ang) Angel.
engel Middle English (1100-1500) (enm) Angel.
anglen Middle English (1100-1500) (enm)
angle English (eng) A fishhook; tackle for catching fish, consisting of a line, hook, and bait, with or without a rod. (informal) (with for) To attempt to subtly persuade someone to offer a desired thing.. (intransitive) To try to catch fish with a hook and line.

Words with the same origin as angle

Descendants of ange
acute cute cutie
Descendants of angelus
angel