base etymology

English word base comes from Proto-Indo-European *gʷreh₂-, Gaulish *barros, Proto-Indo-European *bʰébʰrus (Beaver.)

You can also see our other etymologies for the English word base. Currently you are viewing the etymology of base with the meaning: (Noun) (now, chiefly, US, historical) The game of prisoners' bars. [from 15th c.].(now, chiefly, US, historical) The game of prisoners' bars. [from 15th c.]

Detailed word origin of base

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
*gʷreh₂- Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro)
*barros Gaulish (cel-gau)
*bʰébʰrus Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro) Beaver.
*gʷréh₂us Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro) Heavy.
*barra Vulgar Latin (la-vul)
*barra Latin (lat) (Vulgar Latin) bar. (Vulgar Latin) barrier.
*gʷarus Proto-Hellenic (grk-pro)
βαρύς Ancient Greek (to 1453) (grc)
barre Old French (842-ca. 1400) (fro) Bar (solid, more or less rigid object with a uniform cross-section smaller than its length).
barre French (fra) (heraldiccharge) bend sinister. (nautical) helm, tiller. (typography) : the bar diacritics ⟨̵⟩, ⟨̶⟩, ⟨̷⟩, and ⟨̸⟩. (typography) : the fraction slash ⟨⁄⟩. (typography) : the pipe mark ⟨|⟩. (typography) : the slash mark ⟨/⟩. (typography, improper) : the backslash ⟨\⟩. Bar, cake, ingot.
βάρος Ancient Greek (to 1453) (grc)
bar English (eng) A non-SI unit of pressure equal to 100,000 pascals, approximately equal to atmospheric pressure at sea level. (horse racing) Denotes the minimum odds offered on other horses not mentioned by name.. Except, other than, besides. (UK, Parliament) A dividing line (physical or notional) in the chamber of a legislature beyond which only members and officials may pass.. (UK, law) The railing [...]
base English (eng) (now, chiefly, US, historical) The game of prisoners' bars. [from 15th c.].

Words with the same origin as base

Descendants of *gʷreh₂-
bar barrister bartender blitz brutal brutality brute crowbar grave gravitational gravity grief grieve guru yahoo
Descendants of *bʰébʰrus
beaver