battle etymology

English word battle comes from Proto-Indo-European *bū-, Proto-Indo-European *bhau(t)-, and later Old French (842-ca. 1400) bataille (Battle.)

You can also see our other etymologies for the English word battle. Currently you are viewing the etymology of battle with the meaning: (Verb Noun) (intransitive) To join in battle; to contend in fight. (transitive) To fight or struggle; to enter into a battle with. (now, _, rare) A division of an army; a battalion.. (obsolete) The main [...](intransitive) To join in battle; to contend in fight. (transitive) To fight or struggle; to enter into a battle with. (now, _, rare) A division of an army; a battalion.. (obsolete) The main [...]

Detailed word origin of battle

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
*bū- Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro)
*bhau(t)- Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro)
battuo Latin (lat) I bang (have sex with). I beat, hit, pound, beat up. I fight.
battālia Late Latin (LL)
bataille Old French (842-ca. 1400) (fro) Battle.
batel Middle English (1100-1500) (enm)
battle English (eng) (intransitive) To join in battle; to contend in fight. (transitive) To fight or struggle; to enter into a battle with. (now, _, rare) A division of an army; a battalion.. (obsolete) The main body, as distinct from the vanguard and rear; battalia.. A general action, fight, or encounter, in which all the divisions of an army are or may be engaged; an engagement; a combat.. A struggle; a contest.

Words with the same origin as battle

Descendants of *bū-
bill billboard boil boiled boiler boiling bull bulldog bullock bullshit