bridge etymology

English word bridge comes from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrēw-, and later Proto-Germanic *brugjǭ (Bridge.)

You can also see our other etymologies for the English word bridge. Currently you are viewing the etymology of bridge with the meaning: (Noun Verb) (billiards, snooker, pool) A cue modified with a convex arch-shaped notched head attached to the narrow end, used to support a player's (shooter's) cue for extended or tedious shots. Also called [...](billiards, snooker, pool) A cue modified with a convex arch-shaped notched head attached to the narrow end, used to support a player's (shooter's) cue for extended or tedious shots. Also called [...]

Detailed word origin of bridge

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
*bʰrēw- Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro) wooden flooring, decking, bridge
*brugjǭ Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) Bridge.
brycġ Old English (ca. 450-1100) (ang)
brycg Old English (ca. 450-1100) (ang) Bridge.
bryċġ Old English (ca. 450-1100) (ang)
brigge Middle English (1100-1500) (enm)
bridge English (eng) (billiards, snooker, pool) A cue modified with a convex arch-shaped notched head attached to the narrow end, used to support a player's (shooter's) cue for extended or tedious shots. Also called a spider.. (billiards, snooker, pool) A particular form of one hand placed on the table to support the cue when making a shot in cue sports.. (bowling) The gap between the holes on a bowling ball. [...]

Words with the same origin as bridge

Descendants of *bʰrēw-
bread brig broth