chop etymology

English word chop comes from English chapman

You can also see our other etymologies for the English word chop. Currently you are viewing the etymology of chop with the meaning: (Verb Noun) (nautical) To vary or shift suddenly.. (obsolete) To exchange, to barter; to swap.. To chap or crack.. To wrangle; to altercate; to bandy words. (mostly, in the plural) A jaw of an animal.. A [...](nautical) To vary or shift suddenly.. (obsolete) To exchange, to barter; to swap.. To chap or crack.. To wrangle; to altercate; to bandy words. (mostly, in the plural) A jaw of an animal.. A [...]

Detailed word origin of chop

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
chapman English (eng) (obsolete) A dealer or merchant, especially an itinerant one.. (obsolete) A purchaser.
chap English (eng) (Southern US) A child.. (UK, dialectal) A customer, a buyer.. (dated, outside, UK, and, Australia) A man, a fellow. (Scotland, northern England) To strike, knock.. (intransitive) Of the skin, to split or flake due to cold weather or dryness.. (transitive) To cause to open in slits or chinks; to split; to cause the skin of to crack or become rough. (archaic, often, in the plural) The jaw.. [...]
chop English (eng) (nautical) To vary or shift suddenly.. (obsolete) To exchange, to barter; to swap.. To chap or crack.. To wrangle; to altercate; to bandy words. (mostly, in the plural) A jaw of an animal.. A change; a vicissitude.. A movable jaw or cheek, as of a vice.. The land at each side of the mouth of a river, harbour, or channel.

Words with the same origin as chop

Descendants of chapman
chap chaps