drove etymology

English word drove comes from Proto-Germanic *drabaz (Dregs.), Proto-Indo-European *dʰers-, Proto-Germanic *drōbuz (Turbid, disturbed, troubled.)

You can also see our other etymologies for the English word drove. Currently you are viewing the etymology of drove with the meaning: (Noun) (collective) A group of hares.. (usually, in the plural) A large number of people on the move (literally or figuratively).. A broad chisel used to bring stone to a nearly smooth surface.. A [...](collective) A group of hares.. (usually, in the plural) A large number of people on the move (literally or figuratively).. A broad chisel used to bring stone to a nearly smooth surface.. A [...]

Detailed word origin of drove

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
*drabaz Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) Dregs.
*dʰers- Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro)
*drōbuz Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) Turbid, disturbed, troubled.
*dræf Old English (ca. 450-1100) (ang)
*dʰreybʰ- Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro) to drive, push
drōf Old English (ca. 450-1100) (ang)
drof Old English (ca. 450-1100) (ang) Draffy, dreggy, dirty, troubled.
*drībaną Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) To drive, push, compel to go.
*draibō Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) A drive, push, move. A roadway. That which is driven; a herd.
drīfan Old English (ca. 450-1100) (ang)
drāf Old English (ca. 450-1100) (ang)
drave Middle English (1100-1500) (enm)
drove English (eng) (collective) A group of hares.. (usually, in the plural) A large number of people on the move (literally or figuratively).. A broad chisel used to bring stone to a nearly smooth surface.. A narrow drain or channel used in the irrigation of land.. A number of cattle driven to market or new pastures.. A road or track along which cattle are habitually driven.. The grooved surface of stone [...]

Words with the same origin as drove

Descendants of *dʰers-
dare