ghast etymology

English word ghast comes from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeysd-, English ghast, Proto-Germanic *gaistijaną, and later Proto-Germanic *gaistaz (Mind. Spirit, ghost. Terror, fear.)

You can also see our other etymologies for the English word ghast. Currently you are viewing the etymology of ghast with the meaning: (Adjective Noun) Having a ghastly appearance; weird. (fantasy) An evil spirit or monster; a ghoul.Having a ghastly appearance; weird. (fantasy) An evil spirit or monster; a ghoul

Detailed word origin of ghast

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
*ǵʰeysd- Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro)
ghast English (eng)
*gaistijaną Proto-Germanic (gem-pro)
*gaistaz Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) Mind. Spirit, ghost. Terror, fear.
gǣstan Old English (ang)
gæstan Old English (ang) To frighten; gast. To torment; afflict.
gāst Old English (ang)
gast Old English (ang) A soul, spirit, breath.
gāstan Old English (ang)
gasten Middle English (enm)
gost Middle English (enm) A breath, blowing, wind; God's breath, a spiritual wind; the blowing of storm. A spiritual force or insight, a gift of prophecy. A villain, scoundrel; a devil incarnate; a wicked-looking creature. The soul of man, spiritual nature. A spiritual being; angel, devil, spirit; soul of a dead person. The Holy Ghost.
ghastly English (eng) Extremely bad.. Horrifyingly shocking.. Like a ghost in appearance; death-like; pale; pallid; dismal. In a ghastly manner.
ghast English (eng) Having a ghastly appearance; weird. (fantasy) An evil spirit or monster; a ghoul.

Words with the same origin as ghast

Descendants of *ǵʰeysd-
Ghost Dance Ghost Festival Holy Ghost antighost gast geist ghastly ghost ghost island ghost station ghosthood ghosthunting gost grey ghost no-go theorem poltergeistic poltergeisty