line etymology

English word line comes from Proto-Indo-European *līno-, and later Proto-Germanic *līną (Flax.)

You can also see our other etymologies for the English word line. Currently you are viewing the etymology of line with the meaning: (Noun Verb) (obsolete) Flax; linen, particularly the longer fiber of flax. (transitive) To cover the inner surface of (something), originally especially with linen.. (transitive) To fill or supply [...](obsolete) Flax; linen, particularly the longer fiber of flax. (transitive) To cover the inner surface of (something), originally especially with linen.. (transitive) To fill or supply [...]

Detailed word origin of line

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
*līno- Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro)
*līną Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) Flax.
līn Old English (ang)
line English (eng) (obsolete) Flax; linen, particularly the longer fiber of flax. (transitive) To cover the inner surface of (something), originally especially with linen.. (transitive) To fill or supply (something), as a purse with money.. To reinforce (the back of a book) with glue and glued scrap material such as fabric or paper.

Words with the same origin as line

Descendants of *līno-
airline borderline coastline headline hotline lifeline lime lineage linen lineup lingerie offline online outline pipeline timeline