perfect etymology

English word perfect comes from Latin faciendus, Latin per-, and later German perfekt (Perfect.)

You can also see our other etymologies for the English word perfect. Currently you are viewing the etymology of perfect with the meaning: (Noun Adjective) (grammar) The perfect tense, or a form in that tense. (analysis) Of a set, that it is equal to its set of limit points, i.e. set A is perfect if A=A'.. (biology) Sexually mature and fully [...](grammar) The perfect tense, or a form in that tense. (analysis) Of a set, that it is equal to its set of limit points, i.e. set A is perfect if A=A'.. (biology) Sexually mature and fully [...]

Detailed word origin of perfect

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
faciendus Latin (lat)
per- Latin (lat) Used to form verbs that are intensive or completive, conveying the idea of doing something all the way through or entirely.. Used to make adjectives or verbs that are "very" something.
perficio Latin (lat) (by extension) I bring about, cause, effect.. I achieve, accomplish. I carry out, execute, perform.. I finish, complete.. I perfect.
perficere Latin (lat)
perfectus Latin (lat)
perfekt German (deu) Perfect.
parfit Old French (fro)
perfit Middle English (enm) Perfect.
perfect English (eng) (grammar) The perfect tense, or a form in that tense. (analysis) Of a set, that it is equal to its set of limit points, i.e. set A is perfect if A=A'.. (biology) Sexually mature and fully differentiated.. (botany) Of flowers, having both male (stamens) and female (carpels) parts.. (grammar, of a tense or verb form) Representing a completed action.. (music) Describing an interval or any [...]

Words with the same origin as perfect

Descendants of per-
experience experienced imperfect inexperienced pardon perceive perception perfection perish perjury perk perky permission permit perpetual persecution persuade persuasion persuasive pierce piercing pilgrim pilgrimage pursue