policy etymology

English word policy comes from Ancient Greek (to 1453) πολίτης, Ancient Greek (to 1453) πολιτεύω, Ancient Greek (to 1453) πόλις, Ancient Greek (to 1453) πολῑτείᾱ, and later Latin politia ((Late Latin) state, government.)

You can also see our other etymologies for the English word policy. Currently you are viewing the etymology of policy with the meaning: (Noun Verb) (Scotland, now, chiefly, in the plural) The grounds of a large country house. [from 18th c.]. (now, rare) Specifically, political shrewdness or (formerly) cunning; statecraft. [from 15th c.]. [...](Scotland, now, chiefly, in the plural) The grounds of a large country house. [from 18th c.]. (now, rare) Specifically, political shrewdness or (formerly) cunning; statecraft. [from 15th c.]. [...]

Detailed word origin of policy

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
πολίτης Ancient Greek (to 1453) (grc)
πολιτεύω Ancient Greek (to 1453) (grc)
πόλις Ancient Greek (to 1453) (grc)
πολῑτείᾱ Ancient Greek (to 1453) (grc)
πολιτεία Ancient Greek (to 1453) (grc)
politia Latin (lat) (Late Latin) state, government.
politia Late Latin (LL)
policie Middle French (ca. 1400-1600) (frm) Policy. Rule; law; regulation.
policy English (eng) (Scotland, now, chiefly, in the plural) The grounds of a large country house. [from 18th c.]. (now, rare) Specifically, political shrewdness or (formerly) cunning; statecraft. [from 15th c.]. (obsolete) A set political system; civil administration. [15th–19th c.]. (obsolete) A state; a polity. [14th–16th c.]. (obsolete) A trick; a stratagem. [15th–19th c.]. (obsolete) Motive; object; [...]

Words with the same origin as policy

Descendants of πολίτης
police policeman political slop sloppy
Descendants of πόλις
metro metropolis metropolitan