sand etymology

English word sand comes from Proto-Indo-European *sem-tio-, Proto-Germanic *sinþaną (To go, to wander.)

You can also see our other etymologies for the English word sand. Currently you are viewing the etymology of sand with the meaning: (Adjective Verb Noun) Of a light beige colour, like that of typical sand. (transitive) To abrade the surface of (something) with sand or sandpaper in order to smooth or clean it.. (transitive) To cover with sand.. [...]Of a light beige colour, like that of typical sand. (transitive) To abrade the surface of (something) with sand or sandpaper in order to smooth or clean it.. (transitive) To cover with sand.. [...]

Detailed word origin of sand

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
*sem-tio- Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro)
*sinþaną Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) To go, to wander.
*sámh₂dʰos Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro) sand
*sandijaną Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) To send.
*samdaz Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) Sand.
*sandō Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) A sending, mission.
sand Old English (ca. 450-1100) (ang) Action of sending, embassy, mission, deputation; message. Sending, service, course of food, dish of food, repast, mess, victuals Sand by the sea, sands, seashore, sandy shore, beach. Sand, gravel.
sand Middle English (1100-1500) (enm)
sand English (eng) Of a light beige colour, like that of typical sand. (transitive) To abrade the surface of (something) with sand or sandpaper in order to smooth or clean it.. (transitive) To cover with sand.. (transitive, historical) To blot ink using sand. (countable, figurative) A moment or interval of time; the term or extent of one's life (referring to the sand in an hourglass).. (countable, obsolete) A [...]

Words with the same origin as sand

Descendants of *sem-tio-
hardware silverware soft softball soften softly software
Descendants of *sinþaną
mouth quicksand sandman sandy sans send sense senseless sensor sins