siding etymology

English word siding comes from English landlubber, English side

You can also see our other etymologies for the English word siding. Currently you are viewing the etymology of siding with the meaning: (Noun) (rail transport) A second, relatively short length of track just to the side of a railroad track, joined to the main track by switches at one or both ends, used either for loading or unloading [...](rail transport) A second, relatively short length of track just to the side of a railroad track, joined to the main track by switches at one or both ends, used either for loading or unloading [...]

Detailed word origin of siding

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
landlubber English (eng) (nautical, pejorative) Someone unfamiliar with the sea or seamanship, especially a novice seaman.
side English (eng) (UK, _, dialectal) Widely; wide; far. (Scotland) Far; distant.. (UK, _, archaic, dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) Wide; large; long, pendulous, hanging low, trailing; far-reaching.. Being on the left or right, or toward the left or right; lateral.. Indirect; oblique; incidental. (British, Australia, Ireland, dated) A television channel, usually as opposed to the one currently being [...]
siding English (eng) (rail transport) A second, relatively short length of track just to the side of a railroad track, joined to the main track by switches at one or both ends, used either for loading or unloading freight, storing trains or other rail vehicles; or to allow two trains on a same track to meet (opposite directions) or pass (same direction) (the latter sense is probably an American definition).

Words with the same origin as siding

Descendants of landlubber
landlubbing
Descendants of side
looking in sigogglin