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You are viewing the etymology of tend meaning: (Verb) (followed by a to infinitive) To be likely, or probable to do something, or to have a certain characteristic. [from the mid-14th c.]. (legal, Old English law) To make a tender of; to offer or tender.(followed by a to infinitive) To be likely, or probable to do something, or to have a certain characteristic. [from the mid-14th c.]. (legal, Old English law) To make a tender of; to offer or tender.. You may also see other English etymologies of tend.
English word tend comes from Proto-Indo-European *tengʰ-, and later Proto-Indo-European *ténos (Extension.).

Tend etymology ?

Tend detailed word origin explanation

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
*tengʰ- Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro)
*ténos Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro) Extension.
*tendō Proto-Italic (itc-pro) To stretch.
tentum Latin (lat)
*tenos Proto-Italic (itc-pro)
tener Latin (lat) (poetic) erotic. Effeminate, sensitive. Soft, delicate, tender. Young, youthful.
tendre Old French (842-ca. 1400) (fro) Tender (soft, delicate) (transitive) to stretch.
*tenden Middle English (1100-1500) (enm)
tend English (eng) (followed by a to infinitive) To be likely, or probable to do something, or to have a certain characteristic. [from the mid-14th c.]. (legal, Old English law) To make a tender of; to offer or tender.