trespass etymology

English word trespass comes from Old French passer (To pass; to pass by.), Old French tres-

You can also see our other etymologies for the English word trespass. Currently you are viewing the etymology of trespass with the meaning: (Verb) (intransitive) To go too far; to put someone to inconvenience by demand or importunity; to intrude.. (intransitive, now, _, rare) To commit an offence; to sin.. (legal) To enter someone else's [...](intransitive) To go too far; to put someone to inconvenience by demand or importunity; to intrude.. (intransitive, now, _, rare) To commit an offence; to sin.. (legal) To enter someone else's [...]

Detailed word origin of trespass

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
passer Old French (fro) To pass; to pass by.
tres- Old French (fro) An intensifying prefix that doesn't change the meaning of the prefixed word Trans- (across; traversing).
trespasser Old French (fro) To travel; to go to. To traverse, to go through.
trespass English (eng) (intransitive) To go too far; to put someone to inconvenience by demand or importunity; to intrude.. (intransitive, now, _, rare) To commit an offence; to sin.. (legal) To enter someone else's property illegally.. (obsolete) To pass beyond a limit or boundary; hence, to depart; to go.. (transitive, obsolete) To offend against, to wrong (someone).

Words with the same origin as trespass

Descendants of passer
bypass pass passage passenger passing passport password past