wit etymology

English word wit comes from Proto-Indo-European *wóyde (To have seen, to know.), Old English wita (Wise man, adviser, counsellor.)

You can also see our other etymologies for the English word wit. Currently you are viewing the etymology of wit with the meaning: (Verb) (ambitransitive, chiefly, archaic) Know, be aware of (constructed with of when used intransitively).(ambitransitive, chiefly, archaic) Know, be aware of (constructed with of when used intransitively)

Detailed word origin of wit

Dictionary entryLanguageDefinition
*wóyde Proto-Indo-European (ine-pro) To have seen, to know.
wita Old English (ang) Wise man, adviser, counsellor.
*wītaną Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) To go; go forth; part. To punish; torment. To see; know.
*witaną Proto-Germanic (gem-pro) To know.
wītan Old English (ang)
witan Old English (ang) To be conscious of, to know or feel (an emotion etc.). To be wise. To know, be aware To blame, accuse, reproach.
witen Middle English (enm) To know.
wit English (eng) (ambitransitive, chiefly, archaic) Know, be aware of (constructed with of when used intransitively).

Words with the same origin as wit

Descendants of *wóyde
advise advisor envy evidence guidance guide guy luxury provide review supervisor survey television verdict vice video view visible vision visit visitor visual wet witness
Descendants of wita
eyewitness